SOCW-Assignment

Discussion:

Discussion in which you explain how considerations about clients’ worldviews, including their spirituality or religious convictions, might affect your interactions with them. Provide at least two specific examples. In addition, explain one way your own spirituality or religious convictions might support your work with a client, and one barrier it might present. Finally, share one strategy for applying an awareness of spirituality to social work practice in general.

 

Assignment:

Being culturally sensitive by respecting your clients’ spirituality and religious traditions, in general, is an important professional competence (Furness & Gilligan, 2010). Applying your spiritual awareness to a specific client case, however, may require even greater skill. In this assignment, you consider how you might address a client’s crisis that includes a spiritual or religious component.

Submit a 2- page paper that answers the following questions:

· As Eboni’s social worker, would you include spirituality and religion in your initial assessment? Why or why not?

· What strategies can you use to ensure that your personal values will not influence your practice with Eboni?

· How would you address the crisis that Eboni is experiencing?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References:

Zastrow, C. H., & Kirst-Ashman, K. K. (2019). Understanding human behavior and the social environment (11th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

· Chapter 3, “Spotlight on Diversity: Relate Human Diversity to Psychological Theories” (pp. 112-114)

· Chapter 7, Sections “Review Fowler’s Theory of Faith Development,” “Critical Thinking: Evaluation of Fowler’s Theory,” and “Social Work Practice and Empowerment Through Spiritual Development” (pp. 339-342)

· Chapter 15, “Highlight 15.2: “Celebration of Life Funerals (pp. 694-696)

 

 

Plummer, S.-B., Makris, S., Brocksen S. (Eds.). (2014). Sessions: Case histories. Baltimore, MD: Laureate International Universities Publishing. [Vital Source e-reader].

· “The Logan Family” (pp. 9-10)

 

 

Atchley, R. C. (2006). Continuity, spiritual growth, and coping in later adulthood. Journal of Religion, Spirituality & Aging, 18(2/3), 19.

 

Hodge, D. R., & Bushfield, S. (2007). Developing spiritual competence in practice. Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Social Work, 15(3-4), 101–127.

 

Linzer, N. (2006). Spirituality and ethics in long-term care. Journal of Religion and Social Work, 25(1), 87–106.

Nelson-Becker, H., & Canda, E. R. (2008). Spirituality, religion, and aging research in social work: State of the art and future possibilities. Journal of Religion, Spirituality & Aging, 20(3), 177–193.

Nelson-Becker, H. (2005). Religion and coping in older adults: A social work perspective. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 45(1/2), 51–67

 

TRANSCRIPT:

Laureate Education (Producer). (2013). Logan family: Episode 3 [Video file]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu

 

Logan Family Episode 5 Program Transcript LOGAN: My father took me to his church last weekend. The whole time he went on about how God gives us life and how it’s not up for us to decide what’s convenient for us or not. He said abortion’s no different than murder. If I do it, I’ll go to hell. I think the same thing sometimes. But I don’t know. I don’t know what to do. [MUSIC PLAYING] LOGAN: My father even told his pastor I’m pregnant and asked him to pray for me. FEMALE SPEAKER: I don’t want to pressure you, but you will have to decide soon. LOGAN: I know. I’m pretty confused. Even my friends, they all have their own opinion what I should do. One friend even bought me a striped Onesies. It’s real cute. Are you sure you don’t want to tell me what to do? Everyone else is. FEMALE SPEAKER: I know it’s hard, but in the end it’s really your decision. LOGAN: Why are all the hard decisions the ones you have to make by yourself? FEMALE SPEAKER: I understand you’re confused. I know you were hoping to go away to college, maybe get a scholarship. I think the best advice I can give is that it’s good to listen to everyone’s opinions, especially those close to you. But in the end, you have to decide what you wanted to do, rather than what anyone else wants. LOGAN: Yes, ma’am. FEMALE SPEAKER: There is one other thing I wanted to mention. We’ve talked about your options, and it’s important to keep an open mind about all of them. But there’s one option we haven’t discussed, adoption. There’s even an open adoption where the birth mother and the adopting family know who each other are and keep in contact. I know it’s a lot to think about. LOGAN: It sure is.