Play the roles of both a conventional doctor and a traditional healer.  As the different roles, how would you answer the questions your peers addressed? How does the added information your peers’ considered play a role in the scenario?

Play the roles of both a conventional doctor and a traditional healer.  As the different roles, how would you answer the questions your peers addressed? How does the added information your peers’ considered play a role in the scenario?

 

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A 72-year-old male presents himself with a diagnosis of pneumonia. He is taking an antibiotic that his primary care physician prescribed. On the new moon he sees a traditional healer that gives him a turtle shell mixture.

After doing an extensive interview, one of the first questions I would ask would be, how long have you had symptoms? How often have you seen the other providers?

I would do a physical exam and decide on treatment.

In this case I would prescribe:

She Dan Chen Pi San- this will calm the cough, clears phlegm-heat; transforms phlegm-heat; calms the mind. Indications wind-heat and phlegm-heat disturbing the lungs, disturbance of the heat due to phlegm-heat obstructing the orifices.

Hu Po Bao Long Wan Clears heat from the heart; transforms phlegm; calms liver-wind; calms the mind. Indications Heat excess which leads to internal movement of liver wind (in children). phlegm-heat in the lungs.

Niu Huang Qing Xin Wan (2/2) clears heat; opens the orifices; calms the mind. Indications pathogenic heat sinks into the interior and enters the pericardium. Closed type of wind-stroke (Zhong Feng).

There is no indication that these treatments will interfere or have an adverse effect on the treatment the patient is already receiving. With that being said I would treat the patient with the traditional TCM treatment.

References:

(n.d.). Retrieved October 13, 2016, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15688692