Paper: Recognizing Effective Visual Communication

Paper: Recognizing Effective Visual Communication

Directions

  1. Peruse your library or the Internet and select a company’s annual report that you find compelling and interesting. There are many annual reports readily viewable online and some of them are digital which adds another dimension to the experience.
  2. Write an analysis of a company’s annual report and the effective use of photographs, diagrams, and charts to portray information. Refer to your text to support your analysis and attribute appropriately.

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  • 500–750 words double spaced with 12-point font
  • Use APA format when attributing your sources (in-text citation that corresponds with a reference list at the end of paper)

with MyLab BusinessCommunication®

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■ ■■ Pose a variety of open-ended questions that help your students develop critical thinking skills

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try other ways of engaging your students during class ■ ■■ Manage student interactions by automatically grouping

students for discussion, teamwork, and peer-to-peer learning

A L W A Y S L E A R N I N G

 

 

Giving Students the Skills and Insights They Need to Thrive in Today’s Digital Business Environment The essential skills of writing, listening, collaborating, and public speaking are as important as ever, but they’re not enough to succeed in today’s business world. As business communication continues to get rocked by waves of innovation—first digital media, then social media, now mobile communication, and watch out for the upcoming invasion of chatbots—the nature of communication is changing. And the changes go far deeper than the tools themselves.

In this exciting but complex new world, no other textbook can match the depth and range of coverage offered by Business Communication Today.

Figure 1.7 The Social Communication Model

The social communication model differs from conventional communication strategies and practices in a

number of significant ways. You’re probably already an accomplished user of many new-media tools, and this

experience will help you on the job.

Tendencies Publication, broadcast

Lecture

Intrusion

Unidirectinal

One to many; mass audience

Control

Low message frequency

Few channels

Information hoarding

Static

Hierarchical

Structured

Isolated

Planned

Resistive

Conventional Promotion: “We Talk, You Listen”

The Social Model: “Let’s Have a Conversation”

Tendencies Converstion

Discussion

Permission

Bidirectional, multidirectional

One to one; many to many

Influence

High message frequency

Many channels

Information sharing

Dynamic

Egalitarian

Amorphous

Collaborative

Reactive

Responsive

Tools, Techniques, and Insights for Communicating Successfully in a Mobile, Digital, Social World

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COMPOSITIONAL MODES FOR DIGITAL AND SOCIAL MEDIA

As you practice using various media and channels in this course, it’s best to focus on the fundamentals of planning, writing, and completing messages, rather than on the specific details of any one medium or system.2 Fortunately, the basic communication skills required usually transfer from one system to another. You can succeed with written communication in virtually all digital media by using one of nine compositional modes:

●● Conversations. Messaging is a great example of a written medium that mimics spoken conversation. And just as you wouldn’t read a report to someone sitting in your office, you wouldn’t use conversational modes to exchange large volumes of information or to communicate with more than a few people at once.

●● Comments and critiques. One of the most powerful aspects of social media is the opportunity for interested parties to express opinions and provide feedback, whether by leaving comments on a blog post or reviewing products on an e-commerce site.

EMBRACING THE BACKCHANNEL

Many business presentations these days involve more than just the spoken conversation between the speaker and his or her audience. Using Twitter and other digital media, audi- ence members often carry on their own parallel communication during a presentation via the backchannel, which the presentation expert Cliff Atkinson defines as “a line of com- munication created by people in an audience to connect with others inside or outside the room, with or without the knowledge of the speaker.”29 Chances are you’ve participated in an informal backchannel already, such as when texting with your classmates or live-

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Producing Business Videos No matter what career path you pursue, chances are you’ll have the need or opportunity to produce (or star in) a business video. For videos that require the highest production quality, companies usually hire specialists with the necessary skills and equipment. For most routine needs, however, any business communicator with modest equipment and a few basic skills can create effective videos.

The three-step process adapts easily to video; professionals refer to the three steps as preproduction, production, and postproduction (see Figure 9.15). You can refer to one of the many books available on basic video production techniques for more detail, but here are the key points to consider in all three steps. (A note on terminology: digital video- graphy has inherited a number of terms from film that don’t make strict technical sense but are in common use anyway, including footage to indicate any amount of recorded video and filming to indicate video recording.)

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6 LEARNING OBJECTIVE

Identify the most important

considerations in the preproduction,

production, and postproduction

stages of producing basic business

videos.

The process of creating videos is

divided into preproduction, pro-

duction, and postproduction.

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Figure 8.2 Business Applications of Blogging

This Xerox blog illustrates the content, writing style, and features that make an effective, reader-friendly company blog. Source: Courtesy of Xerox Corporation.

Like many large corporations, Xerox has a variety

of blogs. This menu give quick access to all of

them.

The search box lets visitors quickly find posts on

topics of interest.

A large photo helps draw readers in.

Readers can subscribe to future posts via email

or RSS newsfeed.

The post title is brief and clear, and it incorporates

key terms likely to trigger hits in search engines

(Internet of Everything and energy).

These links provide access to other posts by this

author and other posts tagged with “innovation.”

Social media share buttons make it easy for

readers to share this post with their followers.

The sidebar lists recent posts and recent com-

ments left by readers.

The post positions the company as an expert in

an important technology field, without overtly

selling Xerox products and services.

H e ro

I m

a g e s /G

e tt

y

Im a g e s

Figure 2.3 Collaboration on Mobile Devices

Mobile connectivity is transforming collaboration activities, helping teams and work groups stay connected

no matter where their work takes them. For example, this team was able to discuss and edit a press release

using their tablets in different locations.

C o u rt e s y o f C a fe R ia

 

 

The Unique Demands of Mobile Business

Communication

Intriguing Glimpses into the Future of Business Communication

The Mobile Revolution

As much of a game changer as social media have been, some experts predict that mobile communication will change the nature of business and business communication even more. The venture capitalist Joe Schoendorf says that “mobile is the most disruptive technology that I have seen in 48 years in Silicon Valley.”21 The researcher Maribel Lopez calls mobile “the biggest technology shift since the Internet.”22

Companies recognize the value of integrating mobile technology, from communica-

THE RISE OF MOBILE AS A COMMUNICATION PLATFORM

Whether it’s emailing, social networking, watching videos, or doing research, the percent- age of communication and media consumption performed on mobile devices continues to grow. For millions of people around the world, a mobile device is their primary way, if not their only way, to access the Internet. Globally, more than 80 percent of Internet users access the web with a mobile device at least some of the time.24

Mobile has become the primary communication tool for many business professionals,

HOW MOBILE TECHNOLOGIES ARE CHANGING BUSINESS

COMMUNICATION

The rise of mobile communication has some obvious implications, such as the need for websites to be mobile friendly. If you’ve ever tried to browse a conventional website on a tiny screen or fill in complicated online forms using the keypad on your phone, you know how frustrating the experience can be. Users increasingly expect websites to be mobile friendly, and they’re likely to avoid sites that aren’t optimized for mobile.30

Writing Messages for Mobile Devices One obvious adaptation to make for audiences using mobile devices is to modify the design and layout of your messages to fit smaller screen sizes and different user interface features(see Chapter 6). However, modifying your approach to writing is also an important step. Reading is more difficult on small screens, and consequently users’ ability to compre- hend what they read on mobile devices is lower than it is on larger screens.18 In fact, research

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DESIGNING MESSAGES FOR MOBILE DEVICES

In addition to making your content mobile-friendly using the writing tips in Chapter 4 (see page 108), you can follow these steps in formatting that content for mobile devices:

●● Think in small chunks. Remember that mobile users consume information one screen at a time, so try to divide your message into independent, easy-to-consume bites. If readers have to scroll through a dozen screens to piece together your message, they might miss your point or just give up entirely.

●● Make generous use of white space. White space is always helpful, but it’s critical

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Figure 17.6 Using Mobile Devices in Presentations

A variety of mobile apps and cloud-based systems can free presenters and audiences from the constraints of

a conventional conference room.

DIGITAL + SOCIAL + MOBILE: TODAY’S COMMUNICATION ENVIRONMENT

The mobile business communication revolution is changing the way employers recruit new talent and the way job candi- dates look for opportunities. Many companies have optimized their careers websites for mobile access, and some have even developed mobile apps that offer everything from background information on what it’s like to work there to application

her career and the industry as a whole. Many of the tools you can use to build your personal brand are available as mobile apps, including blogging platforms, Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Dozens of apps are available to help with various aspects of your job search. Résumé creation apps let you quickly

job-search strategies: Maximize Your Mobile

THE FUTURE OF COMMUNICATION

The bots are back. Automated bots (short for robots) made a small wave a decade or so ago when “chatbots” began appear- ing on websites to help companies handle online conversations with customers. Ikea’s Anna, perhaps the first chatbot to get widespread attention, was built to answer routine questions from customers looking for advice regarding the chain’s fur- niture products. Other chatbots followed, smartphones gained virtual “voicebot” assistants, and non-chatty bots continued

Communication Bots

THE FUTURE OF COMMUNICATION

The Internet of Things (IoT) refers to the billions of devices now connected to the Internet and the networking potential of having all these gadgets communicate with each other, feed data into vast information warehouses, and interact with peo- ple and the physical environment. These “things” range from simple sensors that measure temperature, location, and other parameters all the way up to robots and other complex systems. People and animals with Internet-capable sensors (such as

the internet of things

S o ft w

a re

G a rd

e n

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the future Of cOMMuNIcatION

If you’ve ever tried to converse in a language other than you native tongue, you know what a challenge this can be. As a listener, you have to convert the incoming sounds to discrete words and assemble these words into coherent phrases and sentences in order to extract the meaning. And unlike reading a written document, you have to do all this processing almost instantaneously, without the luxury of going back over some- thing you didn’t get. As a speaker, you have to find the right

Real-Time Translation

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Assessing an audience’s emotional response is an important step in judging the success of many communication efforts. If you’re presenting a new idea to upper management, for exam- ple, you can try to read facial clues and other nonverbal signals to determine whether the executives seem excited, annoyed, bored, or anywhere in between.

But what if you’re not there in person and your message has to stand on its own? How can you judge the audience’s reaction? This challenge has been taken up by a range of artificial intelli-

Emotion Recognition Software

THE FUTURE OF COMMUNICATION

Figure 5.6a

Optimizing for mobile includes

writing short headlines that get

right to the point.

This introduction conveys only the

information readers need in order

to grasp the scope of the article.

All the key points of the documents

appear here on the first screen.

Readers who want more detail can

swipe down for background infor-

mation on the five points.

M S

O ff ic