Essay

Jonah Goldhagen contends that the Germany people were willing accomplices to the holocaust, citing the lack of resistance and the gains many common citizens enjoyed as his chief proof.   Attached is Charles Weber’s review of his classic work Hitler’s Willing Executioners: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust.  Link (Links to an external site.) You buying or selling?  

How long do the essays have to be?

You just have to answer the question. Having said the great non-answer of all essays questions, keep these points in mind:

· These are mini-research papers, not the standard handwritten blue book exercises you may get in a traditional in class/course where you have 45 minutes to read, prepare and write the essay.

· You can see the questions in advance. The Essays are listed in the introduction screen of the essay content item. You can prepare the essay in advance while you are completing the module readings, lectures and viewing the on line links. You must answer one of the questions listed.

· I expect far more than a short answer/outline type of response; we require a fully developed essay. The essays fall into different categories – a straight factual essay “Describe …; a topical “Compare ….; or opinion “What was ……” or a “Make or Break the following argument” Some of the essays contain a main question and then a follow-up; read the questions carefully.

· What we are looking for is a solid topical paragraph that restates the question and outlines your key points.  Your lead paragraph does not do that it just wanders which makes it difficult to follow your argument.  You should then follow with a series of paragraphs that address each part of your argument and provide enough detail to demonstrate your mastery of the subject matter and proves your point. Remember the SGR – Stupid Guy Rule.  The only one that knows anything about this subject is you.  Don’t assume that anyone else knows – esp. me.  Finally, a strong closing that wraps up your argument and repeats your key points.    “Tell me what you’re going to tell me; Tell me; Tell me what you told me.”

· Although I do not specify a word count, you will find that it will be difficult to answer these questions in less than 500 -650 words or 2-3 pages.

Essays are worth 25 points each and are graded against the following rubric.

 

Criteria Maximum Points Partial Points Zero points
Grammar & Syntax 5 Points – if posting is error free. 1 or 3 Points – if essay contains one to four errors. Zero points – if essay contains 5 or more errors.
Contains a solid topical paragraph that restates the question and outlines 3-4 key points of your argument 7 Points – if posting meets the criterion. 1 to 5 Points – one point for each of the items listed under criterion. Zero points if all items are omitted.
Each key point is supported by a stand-alone paragraph with a topical sentence and proof for your points and concepts. 8 Points – if posting meets the criterion. 1 to 5 Points – one point for each of the items listed under criterion. Zero points if all items are omitted.
Essay contains a summery paragraph that summarizes and concludes your argument. 5 Points – if posting is error free. 1 or 3 Points – if essay contains one to four errors. Zero points – if essay contains 5 or more errors.
Essay contains direct quotes and is annotated with source. -10 points for the entire essay if sources are not properly documented -15 points for the entire essay if sources are not documented, if an encyclopedia article is used as a source, or if the essay is not submitted through Turnitin Zero points for the entire essay if sources are not documented or if essay is “pasted” or copied from another source or if a Wikipedia article is used as a source…

 

The Turnitin Analysis:   Barton uses Turnitin as fact checker and plagiarism detection software.   The real benefit however is as a coaching device for the student.   When you submit your essay, Turnitin conducts a search and analysis of your work.   It then provides you with a composite % score and a color coded analysis of just how much of the work is original.   If the passage was taken from another source, Turnitin will identify the source.    The allows you the opportunity to rework the essay

A couple of Notes:

· Turnitin only reports the % of information pulled from an outside source; it does not ignore the passage if you cited the source.

· Graphics often drive the “score” up

· Your grade is based on the essay’s content not the Turnitin score.   In some instances where the essays contains large .jpg files for the newspaper article option for example, that score may be very high despite the written work is all original.

 Turnitin is required for all essays submitted in the course.

Previously Submitted Work.   

You are not allowed to submit work from a previous course from any school without prior permission in advance of the assignment’s due date.  This includes courses where I was the primary instructor.   At the minimum, I require the College, Course Title and Professor, as well as when you submitted the work and the score that you received.    I will then verify that information and either accept or reject the work.

In the event that you do not coordinate the submission in advance that will be considered plagiarism.

Citing Sources

You are required to cite information (or detail your source) that is not your own original thought or the result of your own original work.  Additionally, you are required to cite that information at the point of reference (In Text Citation) and not as part of a ‘Works Cited’ list at the end.  While it is completely acceptable to ‘borrow’ ideas and concepts – even direct quotes, from other sources; ‘Fair Use’ restricts the amount of passages you may copy in.  The intent is that the overwhelming majority of the essay is original work, not something culled from various internet sources.  Encyclopedia websites and encyclopedia-style websites, such as Britannica, About.com, Sparknotes and Wikipedia in all forms are banned as a reference from the course.

The Purdue University On line Writing Lab (OWL)   is an excellent reference source.  https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/